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Chroniques politiques et culturelles (CP) - 01 JAN 1944 - Anglais
     [CP-1944-00-01-EN]


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Aperçu rapide de l'OCR:
A A- . ' i '', ' ' : i: :' ' x.A Ay;A:A; vAO ' .¿: AA
Impressions of' a Swiss lecturer to the Anglo-
Saxon interneésí "by 33r.JB « Koto er. '
To-day, I am oing to tell .you soÄgth g-about the life jf the ,
évades from Australia and New-Zealand-. Within short , the Aussies are
going to leave our country* They came to us about a year ago, after
their-esoape fro4 Italian prison-camps«* It has been quite a thrill for ;.
the Swiss to meet again Britishers, after more than three years of yirti
al isolation from all contact with them.
Your boys in Switzerland are living in several camps. MQW mind
you, by camps you must not understand thents with barbed wire around»
No, they 'live in villages all over the country. Three camps have even
.-.; -.'" - .".-.;'. A ' ' ' '. ; -. ' ' ''..'. "- _ :.' :;."-.. A .;. T v A. A ,,." ' ' ¿" ' ':-',A'A"v' '' ,," ' ' -''"'v ' . A:.
been established: in quitte well-known .holiday-r-èèprt s| i o íóf hÄ T%*«*. i
in the mountains, one on a large lake..There'the hoya mostly s,tay in,bi|
confortable hotels which in the good old times.were crowded with tour
from all over the world. Although as a rule confined to.thé area of
the camp, the evades mOve freely about within this area, On short strol
to the next pub or on longer walks. Evening mostly finds them in one
of the local pubs, chatting amongst themselves and with Swiss friends'
or absorbed in a game of bridge. That of course is provided nos pictures
are shown that night, for the regular cinema-nights always are most
popular events. , A A
After some initial difficulté.fes the*camps are well organised by now
Whilst relations with Swiss authorities and the necessary military con-i
tro1 are dealt with by a Swiss offiéeí oh the spot* a senior British
officer is in command of every camp, with a few officers assisting him.
After it had become evident that vthe évadés would have to stay in Switzerland
for quite a while, everyone; lias been given opportunity to
choose some progessional training which might prove useful at home.
Each camp specialised on some particular kind of training and you will ; :
find camps where brick-laying is instructed, others with courses in
electricity, in painting or plombing, in farming or clerk's work as
book-keepámg, typing etc. At the same time, everybody can take up languá
Besides progessional training, sports bring about a welcome change
in the daily life.In winter, they,skied in a big way* Now, there are
swimming-competitions, tennis-tournaments, matches in foot-ball, basket-?
ball, boxing or' cricket.,. both within the camps and between various
camps or even British, and Swiss teams. In those afore -mentionned
holiday-resort-camps mounteneering is quite popular with many évadés,
whilst others do not hold with walking uphill and prefer to confine tl
their movements to the dance-floor. In several camps in fact the évadés
h;ave formed bands of their own and are providing dance-music to
those of their fellows who believe inlearning all about Switzerland
by taking oui? a pretty girl. I tell you it is great fun to attend such
a party, in a hall crowded with; chap's in battledress, chatting, singing
and enjoying themselves, a& far aa, íhtí uot too plentyfulJ. pay alluwn '"
An excellent, highly popular weekly paper in English,espacially
published for British évadés, with;the main items of military and political
events from the world brings reports from all camps, thus.providing
a vivid picture of their various activities. Also you will find
in that paper good short stories and jokes for entertainment as well
as funny cartoons about the évadés-life.
Among the most impressive events of the week counts the Sundayevening
church-service in one particular camp where besides évadés
there is a large camp of ISA-internees.A British padre in turn with
a Swiss priest who for many years has lived abarcad is conducting a
very simple service, ending with a short stimulating àermon. The atmosphere
in this tiiïiy little village-church, crowded with soldiers from
avery English-speaking country,reflects very accurately the spiritual
union which binds together these men from all over the world.
The Swiss army has set up a special organisation for delivering tí
talks on various topics of interest to the évadés.The British camp
commander is invited to ask for lectures which to his belief might ih#
terest his men, be it on some technical problem, on points of history
or on the military and political developments of our time» I for one
have had the pleasure of addressing thé évadés of numerous camps,
mostly on current events which I tried to explain from the point of
view of an unbiassed Swiss citizen. This topic of course always arises
great interest, the couree of present events being so decisive for
the future of each of us. ,i
It is thus that I have made many" friends amongst the British éva.
dés. I happen to know most of the members of the British Air Force, a
merry crowd living in a separate camp of their own, and I know equally
very many army-chaps, officers and other ranks. I have met In particular
numerous Aussies, and I tell you, I like them a lot, AH the
Johnies and Bobs, the Kens and Pat's and however they may be called
send you their love. They all long for, you and are looking forward
to the day they are home again.
fa hnù'cu Pc*«,«Ucu*sf& &** yf f lc ?LJ
f , To «wègy I am going to tell you jéomething about the life of '
the(Äistraiiajf and »ew-Jrealandi«fc « áá i thej-Aussies who just about
a year ago have, come into our country after their escape from italian
prison-camps. It has been quite a thrill for the Swiss to meet again
Britishers, after more than three years of virtual isolation from
all contact with them. -My of. us bravo jumped—at—the opportunity— T»
Trf—oontaoting %hcm, thu«fc-%g«6kijag~4aja ng
tfegeiag »8ta ig-í'ecge.
Your boys in Switzerland are living in several camps,* &
eentaiaing between 200 and11Q0G évadée. Now mind you,j[you "must not
understand iPjp- asqsS. tents with barbed wire around. No, they live in
villages all over the country, three camps have even been established
in quite well-known holiday-resorts, two of them up in the mountains,
one on a large lake. There the boys mostly stay in big comfortable
hotels which in the good old times were crowded with tourists from
all continents. Although as a rule confined to the area of the camp
the evades move freely about within that area, on short strolls to
the next pub or on°$S? s. Evening mostly finds them in one of the
local pubs, chatting amongst themselves and with swiss friends or
absorbed in a game of brjffge; that of course is provided no pictures
are shown that night, for the regular cinema-nights always are most
After some initial difficulties the camps are well organisée
by now: Whilst relations with swiss authorities and the necessary
military control are dealt with by a swiss officer on the spot, a
senior british officer is in command of every camp, with a few
other officers assisting him. After it had become evident that the
evades would have to stay in Switzerland for quite a while, everyone
has been given opportunity to choose some professional training
which might prouve usefull at home. Each camp specialised on some
particular kind of training and you will find camps where brick-laying
is instructed, others with courses in electricity, in painting or
plombing, in farming or clerk's-work as book-keeping typing etc.At
the same time everybody can XfiXXS take up languages.
Besides gHHIgj| professional training .sports bring about
a welcomechange iqfctne daily llfe.»Tnerue aré swimming-competitbions,
tennis-tournaments, matches in football,basketball, boxing or cricket,
both within the camps and between various camps oHleJiifOtrrgg tearns.
In those afore-mentionned holiday-resort*camps mounteneering is quite
popular with many evades, whilst others do not hold with walking up
hill and prefer to confine their movements to the dance floor. In
several camps in fact the evades have formed bands of their own and
are providing dance-music to those of their fellows who belie,
Xleeaarrnniinngg aalUl about SSrwti,tzeerrllaanMd bbyy e*WM4w*a&-ir,f*"4M*«H« -it5=f—ei!iP*ig - -
you, it is great fun to attend such a party, in a hall eroded with
chaps in battledress, chatting, singing and enjoying themselves as
far as the not too plentyfull pay allows them to.
An excellent, highly popular weekly paper.., ""especially iftMIÎS
published for british evades, with the main items of military and police*,
tical events in Ynjrnpo and -tho ouljldii I.úJJM brings reports from all
camps thus providing vivid picture of their various activities. Also
you will find in that paper good short stories and jokes for entertainment
as well as funny cartoons about the evadés-life.
Among the most impressive events of the- week counts the
sunday-evening church-service in one particular camp where besides
evades there is a large camp of USA-interées.A british padre in turn
with a swiss priest who for many years has lived abroad is conducting
a very simple service, ending with a short stimulating sermon. The
athomosphere in this tiny little village church, crwâded with soldiers
from aü m.'bjf e trtte english-speaking world? reflects very accurately
the spiritual uniom which binds together 230L «inL these men from all
The swiss army has set up a special organisation for
delivering talks on various topics of interest to the evades. The
british camp commander is invited to ask for lectures which to his
belief might interest his men, be it on some technical problem,
hn points of history or on the burntftg ¡PL&MXäKä military
political $uooT¡io»s or our time. I for one have had the pleasure of
addressing p the evades of numerous camps, mostly on current events
which I tried to explain from the point of view of a äSXSä unbiassed
swiss citizen.This topic of course always arises great interest, the
course of present events äJü&IälKg being so décisif for the future of
It is thus that I have made many friends amongst the
british evades. I happen to know most of the members of WjÊSUfMÊXX.
the british Air Forces, a merry crowd living in a separate camp of thei
own, and I know equally very many army-chaps, officers and other ranks.
I have met in particular numerous Aussies, and I tell you, IxLike them
a lot. All the Johnnies and Bobs, the Kens and Pat's and hofeavei»Cthey
may be called send you their love; they all long for you
and are looking forward to the day they are home again.
v.1.09