English |  Deutsch |  Français |  Italiano |  Español
Archives historiques - 
Recherche:

Utilisez le signe + pour séparer les mots.
Période: Jour Mois Année Jour Mois Année
De 19
A 19
 
Filtrer les résultats: Emission Langue
Chroniques politiques et culturelles (CP) - 03 JAN 1944 - Anglais
     [CP-1944-00-03-EN]


Télécharger les fichiers

Aperçu rapide de l'OCR:
Impressions of a Swiss-lecturer to the Anglo-Saxon internees
."" By D. Ernst Kober.
To-night, I am going tjp teil you something about the life of. the
British evades. They are going to leave soon our country where they
lived after their escape from prison-camps, some of them from Italy,
about a year ago, especially Indian soldiers, from France. It has been
quite a thrill for the Swiss to meet Britishers again, after more than
three years of virtual isolation from all contact with them. And then
the Hindous have caused quite a sensation, for it is not often that we
have the opportunity of meeting soldiers from so far-away countries.
The boys live in several camps. Now, mind you, by camps you must
not understand tents with barbed wire around. No, they live in villages
all over the country ¿..Three camps have even been established in quite
well known holiday-resorts. Tiio Of them up in the mountains, one on a
large lake. The Hindou-camp, in particular, is in a region where the
climate is most suitable for men used to tropic conditions.Although as
a rule confeâ to the area of the camp,, the evades move freely in that
area, on short strolls to the next pub or on longer walks. Evening mostly
finds them in one of the local pubs, chatting amongst themselves or
with Swiss friends if they can agree upon a language known to both of
After some initial difficulties, the camps are well organised by
now.Whilst relations with Swiss authorities and the necessary military
control are dealt with by a Swiss officer on the spot, a senior British
officer is in command of every camp with a few officers assisting him.
In the Indiancamp in particular there are officers from the Indian army
too, glad to be back with the gallant troops they commanded durint the
war. After it had become evident that the evades would have to stay in.
Switzerland quité a while, averyonê has been given opportunity to choose
some professional training which might prove useful at home. Each camp
specialised on some particular kind of training and you will find camps
where brick-laying is instructed, others with.courses in electricity, in
painting of; pi. OTnhi ng, .Jin fajmg-.-
body can take up languages. The instructors have been chosen among the
évadés themselves, regardless to rank and only acqordoeng to the knowledge
in that particualr trade.
Besides professional training, sports bring about a welcome change
in the daily life. Those who were in winter, skied in a big way. Now,in
summer, there are competitions in swimming, t ennis, matches in football,
basket-ball, boxing or cricket, both within the camps and between varioui
camps or evenbetween British and Swiss teams.In some camps, mount eneerini
is quite popular with many avades, whilst others do not hold with walking
uphill and prefer to confine their movements to the dance-floor.In seve*
ral áamps in fact the evades have formed bands of their own and are providing
dance-music to those of their fellows who believe in learning all
about Switzerland by.taking out a pretty girl.I tell you it is a great
fun to attend such a party, in a hall crowded with chaps in battledress,
chatting, . singing and enjoying themselves, aa far ao tho not too,, plaatyfu.
pay nlluws ULMm. lu?
An excellent highly popular paper in English],;, especially published :;
for British évadés with the main items of military and political events
from the world brings reports from all camps thus providing a vivid pic-
ture of their various activities. Also you will find in that paper good
short stories and jokes for entertainment, as well as funny cartoons
about the évadés-life.
Among the most impressive events of the week counts the Sunday-evening
church-service in one particular camp where besides évadés these
is a large camp of USA-internees. A British padre in turn with a Swiss
priest who has lived for many years abroad, is conducting a simple service
ending with a stimulating sermon. The atmosphere íB this tiny little
village-church, crowded 'with soldiers from every English-speaking countrj
reflects most accurately the spiritual union which binds together all
these men from all over the world.
The Swiss army has set up a special organisation for delivering
talks on various topics of interest to the évadés. The British camp commander
is at liberty to ask for lectures which to his belief might interest
his men, be it on some technical problem, on points of history or
on the military or political developments of our time. I for one have
had the pleasure of addressing the évadés of several camps, mostly on
current events which I tried to explain from the point of view of an
unbiassed Sy iss citizen. This topic quite naturally arises great interest
the course of these events being so decié'ive for the fuinupe of eachone
Not knowing Hindoustani, I was unable unfortunately to address the
Indian troops in our country.But la have met several of their officers
and have made friends amongst them.So I can tell you from them that all
British évadés from the Middle and Near East are longing for you«They
send you their love and are looking forward to the happy day they will
To-night I am going to
.1 yon something about the life of
country after their escape from prison camp, some of them from
Italy just about a year ago, some, especially fndian soldiers,
from France. It has been quite a thrill for the Swiss to meet
Britishers again, after more than three years of virtual isa&ation
from all contact with them. And then the Hindus have caused quite
a sensation, for it is not often that we have the opportunity of
meeting soldiers from so far-away countries.
The boys live in several camps, each containing k*&9&exL-2D0
and 1CC0 évadée. NOW mind you, by camps you must not understand
tents with barbed wire around. No, they live in villages all over
the country, three camps have even been established in quite well
known holiday-resorts, two of them up in the mountains, one on
a large lake. ipne Hindu-camp in particular is in a region where
the climate is most suitable for men used to tropic conditions.
Although as a rule confined to the area of the camp, the évadés
move freely in that area, on short strolls to the next pub or
on longer walks. Evening mostly finds them in one of the local
pubs, chatting amongst themselves or wi r Swiss friends if they
can J1SÍ agree upon a language known to both of them.
After some initial difficulties the carps are well organize»
by now. Whilst relations with swiss authorities and the necessary
military control are dealt with by a swiss o'ficer on the spot,
a senior british officer is in command of every camp, with a few
other officers assisting him?' The Indian-camp in particular HX,
ggi therej&xe officers from the indian army too, glad to be back
with tne çrodps they commanded during the war. After id had become
evident, that the évadés would have to stay in Switzerland for
quite a while, everyone has been given opportunity to choose
some professional training which might prove usefull at home.
Each camp specialised on some particular kind of training and you
will find camps where brick-laying is instructed, others with
courses in electricity, in painting or plombing, in farming or '
clerk's-work. At the same time everybody can take up languages.
The instructors have been chosen among the évadés themselves,
regardless to rank and only according to the knowledge in that
Besides professional training sports bring about a welcome
change in the daily life. Those who were here in winter ,
skied in aK big way. Now in summer there are competitions in
swimming, tennis, matches in football, basket-ball, boxing or
cricket, both within the camps and between varions camps or even
british and swiss teams. In some camps mounteneering is quite
popular with many évadés, whilst others do not hold with walking
up hill and prefer to confine their movements to the dance floor.
In several camps in fact the évadés have formed bands of their own
and are providing dance-music to those of their fellows who believe
in learning all about Switzerland by taking out a pretty girl.
I tell you, it is great fun to attend such a party, in akll crowded
with chaps in battle-dress, chatting, singing and enjoying themselv-s
as far as the not too plentyfull pay allows them to.
An excellent highly popular weekly paper T especially
published for british évadés with the main itmes of military and
political events from the world brings reports from all camps thus
providing a vivid picture of their various activities. Also you will
find in that paper good short stories and jàkes for entertainment,
as well as funny cartoons about the évadés life.
Among the most impressive events of the week counts the
sunday-evening church-service in one particular camp where besides
évadés there is a large camp of USA-internees. A british padre in
turn with a swiss priesCwho for many years has lived abroad, is conducting
a simple service ending with a stimulati ng sermon. The
Athmosphere in this tiny little village church, crawded with
soldiers from EXX every english speaking country reflects most
accurately the spiritual union which binds together all these men
from all over the world.
The swiss army has set up a special organisation for delivering
talks on various topics of interest to the évadés. The
british camp commander is at liberty to ask for lectures which to
his belief might interest his men, be it on some technichal problem,
on points of history or on the military or political developments
of our time. I for one have had pleasure of addressing the évadés
of numerous camp3, mostly on current events which I tried to este
plain from the point of view of an unbiassed swiss citizen. This top
quite naturally arises great interest the course of these events
being so décisif for the future of eachone of us,
Not knowing Hindustani I was unable unfortunately to
address the indian troops in our country. But I have met several
of their officers and have made friends amongst them. So I can
tell you from them that all british évadés from the Middle and #ear
East are longing fcsjga aQ y for you; they send you their love and
are looking forward to the happy day they will be home again.
v.1.09